Guest blogger Xenia Sundell of Thanks, Mail Carrier lends her back-to-school tips + the convenience of using Restaurant.com, while the whole family settles into a new routine! 

As the 2014-2015 school year is underway, parents everywhere can agree that there is an adjustment period for the entire family… that isn’t always the most fun. Even the children who are the most eager and excited to return to the classroom can take a little time getting used to the difference in routine, structure, activity level and pressures of being in school versus relaxing over the summer.

While many back-to-school tips focus on things that can be done in the weeks leading up to the first day (e.g. earlier bedtimes, getting school supplies early), I also have a few suggestions as to ways to ease the transition once the bell has actually rung.

 

1. Encourage gradual change. Chances are your child isn’t coming home with three hours of homework on day 1, sobe sure to give them time to work their way back into the before- and after-school routines in your home. Have them help decide what they want packed in their lunch for the first week. Second week, have them help with the process. By thelunchboxes third week, they’ll be doing it on their own (hopefully) without complaints.

 

 

2. Have a spare. Having a back-up for important items can keep life running smoothly, particularly during the beginning of the school year and getting back into the swing of things. Whether that means an extra lunchbox or pair of gloves to send when the first gets left at school, having a second set of markers in case some dry out or keeping an extra brush in the car for when you are dropping your daughter off and suddenly realize her hair looks like a bird’s nest (just me?), having a spare can help keep the stress level down.

 

3. Stay positive. No matter how far you’ve planned ahead or how practical and realistic you may be, life often throws curve balls as families return to their fall schedules – try not to overreact or pass on your anxiety! Eliminate as many tensions and stressors as possible by having frozen dinners prepared or, even better, or pick up a few Restaurant.com Giftdinner out Certificates so that the whole family can relax and go out to eat together. No prep, no cooking, no dishes afterward!

 

4. Stay in touch with your child’s teacher. Emails and newsletters are typically convenient for everyone – communicate often with your child’s teacher so that you are in-the-know about your child’s learning and experiences.
Also, depending on your own schedule and the teacher’s wishes, offer to volunteer once a week or once a month so that you can be familiar with your child’s classroom, peers and lessons.

 

5. Reinforce your love. The most important thing that you can do for your child is to be there for him/her as much as possible. From laughing over jokes they bring home to reassuring mom with kidsthem that tomorrow is another day, having consistent care and support from a loving parent is always going to be a child’s best advantage to having a great school year!

 

 

 

                                                                       

                                 

What do you recommend to start the 2014-2015 school year off foolproof? 

                                                                                 

 

                                                                                 About Xenia Sundell:

Xenia Sundell family photo_web

Xenia Sundell is a stay-at-home mom to two gorgeous girls and the wife to a sweet (and usually exhausted) workaholic. After realizing just how much she and the girls enjoyed the ‘vroooom’ sound of the mail truck coming down the block, Xenia started Thanks, Mail Carrier in 2009, a blog focusing on family-friendly reviews and giveaways of the best products, companies, and services that can be delivered right to your front door. Featuring honest and entertaining posts for the whole family as well as humor, recipes, travel, photos and more, this social media mom has tried it all and enjoys passing along the details that can help consumers when thinking about their next purchase.